March 2, 2018

Public meeting set for March 13 on Newtonsville wastewater project

BATAVIA, Ohio (March 2, 2018) — A public information meeting on the proposed Newtonsville wastewater system and treatment plant will be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 13, at CNE High School, 5327 Hutchinson Rd, Batavia.  Doors will open at 6:30 p.m. Newtonsville property owners are invited to attend and participate.

The Clermont County Water Resources Department and Clermont County Public Health will present information and answer questions regarding the need for a wastewater system and treatment plant. County Commissioners will listen to comments from property owners both for and against the project.

Currently, properties in the Village of Newtonsville have septic systems. The project will serve 145 property owners and 230 parcels of land in and around the village. In October 2012, residents were notified by Clermont Public Health that a significant number of homes had failing septic systems, and sewage created a health risk. At that time, Public Health said that a centralized sewer system and wastewater treatment plant were needed.

Since then, the Clermont County Water Resources Department  has completed extensive engineering fieldwork and project design. A number of public information meetings have been held, as well as a public hearing. Letters have been sent to property owners to gather their input on alternative plans. The design of the system and wastewater plant, which is proposed to be built on vacant land behind the village administration building, has been completed. The treatment plant is designed to treat up to 57,000 gallons a day.

The total cost of the Newtonsville Collection System Assessment Project and the Newtonsville Wastewater Treatment Plant Project is estimated to be nearly $8.2 million. Grants will defray a portion of the cost. The project has been awarded a $2 million grant from USDA Rural Development, and a $1 million grant from the Ohio Public Works Commission. The county will contribute $1.1 million from wastewater capital improvement funds. Property owners will be assessed for the balance, with a 40-year loan at an interest rate of 2.25%. The estimated assessment is $189.93 per frontage foot of property over the 40 years, said WRD Director Lyle Bloom.

More about the project can be found here.

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August 17, 2017

Public hearing to be held on Newtonsville sewer project on Sept. 25

BATAVIA, Ohio (Aug. 17, 2017) – A public hearing will be held at 7 p.m. Monday, Sept. 25, to allow the Board of County Commissioners to receive input from Newtonsville property owner on the construction of a wastewater system and treatment plant. The public hearing will be held at the Pattison Park Lodge, 2228 US 50, Batavia 45103.

Currently, properties in the Village of Newtonsville have septic systems. The project will serve 145 property owners and 230 parcels of land in and around  the village. In October 2012, residents were notified by Clermont Public Health that a significant number of homes had failing septic systems, and sewage created a health risk. At that time, Public Health said that a centralized sewer system and wastewater treatment plant were needed.

Since then, the Clermont County Water Resources Department (WRD) has completed extensive engineering fieldwork and project design. A number of public information meetings have been held, and letters have been sent to property owners to notify them of progress. The design of the system and wastewater plant, which is proposed to be built on vacant land behind the village administration building, has been completed. The treatment plant is designed to treat up to 57,000 gallons a day.

The total cost of the Newtonsville Collection System Assessment Project and the Newtonsville Wastewater Treatment Plant Project is estimated to be nearly $8.2 million. Grants will defray the cost. The project has been awarded a $2 million grant from USDA Rural Development, and a $1 million grant from the Ohio Public Works Commission. The county will kick in $1.1 million from wastewater capital improvement funds. Property owners will be assessed for the balance, with a 40-year loan at an interest rate of 2.25%. The estimated assessment is $189.93 per frontage foot of property over the 40 years, said WRD Director Lyle Bloom.

If commissioners approve the project, construction is expected to start in September 2018 and to be completed in December 2019, Bloom said.

Certified letters will be sent to all property owners notifying them of the public hearing.

More information on the project can be found on the project’s website.

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July 14, 2017

Community Alternative Sentencing Center will soon admit women

BATAVIA, Ohio (July 14, 2017) – Clermont County Commissioners approved on July 12 the expansion of the Community Alternative Sentencing Center (CASC) to serve women. The CASC, which has been open since September 2015 under the management of Greater Cincinnati Behavioral Health Systems, provides an alternative to jail for misdemeanants who are convicted of drug- or alcohol-related crimes.

Since 2015, the CASC has served men. It provides various kinds of treatment and therapy, including medication-assisted treatment (MAT), cognitive behavioral therapy, sober recovery meetings, and work readiness classes. It is funded by Clermont County, and its current budget is $440,800.

Now, thanks to a grant from the federal 21st Century Cures Act, Clermont County will start admitting women to the CASC as of Sept. 1, said BCC President David Uible. “This will allow us to address a gap in our attempts to address this crisis. We have wanted to offer this treatment alternative to women, and the grant will allow us to do so.”

Under the Cures Act, $26 million was allocated to the State of Ohio to fight the opioid epidemic. Clermont County, as one of the top 15 counties in the state most affected by the crisis, was given priority in the grant process, according to Karen Scherra, Executive Director of the Clermont County Mental Health & Recovery Board (CCMHRB), who led the application for the grant.

CCMHRB is receiving approximately $418,000 in the first year of the grant and up to $700,000 in the second year, which is being provided to the County to fund the CASC program. By the second year, the county hopes to serve up to 25 women in the pod. Medication-assisted treatment will be emphasized, Scherra said.

“We were very pleased to be awarded funding to expand CASC to women, which will allow a greater access to needed services and a better chance for recovery,” Scherra said.

The CASC, which operates in a wing of the County Jail, will operate its women’s pod completely separated from the men’s. The new staff will include an admissions coordinator, three counselors, three aides, a part-time employment specialist, and a recovery coach. It will also include dedicated hours from a physician and nurse.

The Community Alternative Sentencing Center – the only one in the State of Ohio – is a voluntary program. Municipal Court judges refer misdemeanants to the CASC if they think they will be good candidates for treatment as opposed to incarceration. Since it began operating under the management of Greater Cincinnati Behavioral Health, the CASC has admitted 378 men. Of those 307 have successfully completed the program, with many transitioning into continued services and supports in the community.

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May 15, 2017

OVI Court receives state certification

BATAVIA, Ohio (May 15, 2017) — The Clermont County OVI Court Specialized Docket has earned final certification from the Ohio Supreme Court’s Commission on Specialized Dockets. The OVI Court works with offenders who have been charged with operating a vehicle while impaired by drugs or alcohol.

To receive the certification, the court had to submit an application, undergo a site visit, and provide specific program materials in response to certification standards that went in to effect in January 2014.

Judge Kevin T. Miles

Ohio Supreme Court Chief Justice Maureen O’Connor congratulated the Clermont County Municipal Court’s OVI Court program and Judge Kevin T. Miles for receiving final certification.

“Specialized dockets divert offenders toward criminal justice initiatives that employ tools and tailored services to treat and rehabilitate the offender so they can become productive members of society,” Justice O’Connor said. “Studies have shown this approach works by reducing recidivism while saving tax dollars.”

Specialized dockets are courts that are dedicated to specific types of offenses or offenders and use a combination of different techniques to hold offenders accountable while also addressing the underlying causes of their behavior. More than 210 specialized dockets in Ohio courts deal with issues such as:

  • Drugs and Alcohol
  • Mental Health
  • Domestic Violence
  • Human Trafficking

The standards provide a minimum level of uniform practices for specialized dockets throughout Ohio, and allow local courts to innovate and tailor to meet their community’s needs and resources.

According to Judge Miles, “The OVI Court Specialized Docket lowers recidivism for multiple OVI offenders by imposing the highest level of community control supervision coupled with frequent judicial monitoring and comprehensive substance abuse treatment.”

The certification requirements include establishing eligibility requirements, evaluating effectiveness of the specialized docket, and assembling a treatment team for implementing daily operations of the specialized docket. The team can include licensed treatment providers, law enforcement, court personnel, and is headed by the specialized docket judge.

The Clermont County OVI Court was established in 2005. Since then, 192 people have successfully completed the program.

The Commission on Specialized Dockets has 22 members who advise the Supreme Court and its staff regarding the promotion of statewide rules and uniform standards concerning specialized dockets in Ohio courts; the development and delivery of specialized docket services to Ohio courts; and the creation of training programs for judges and court personnel. The commission makes all decisions regarding final certification.

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January 9, 2017

Family Treatment Court earns final certification

Judge Shriver

BATAVIA, Ohio (Jan. 9, 2017) — The Family Dependency Treatment Court of the Clermont County Juvenile Court has earned final certification from the Ohio Supreme Court’s Commission on Specialized Dockets.

To receive the certification, the local court had to submit an application, host a site visit, and provide specific program materials in response to certification standards that went into effect in January 2014.

Ohio Supreme Court Chief Justice Maureen O’Connor congratulated the Clermont County Juvenile Family Dependency Treatment Court and Judge James A. Shriver for receiving final certification.

“Specialized dockets divert offenders toward criminal justice initiatives that employ tools and tailored services to treat and rehabilitate the offender so they can become productive members of society,” said Justice O’Connor. “Studies have shown this approach works by reducing recidivism while saving tax dollars.”

Specialized dockets are courts that are dedicated to specific types of offenses or offenders, and use a combination of different techniques for holding offenders accountable while also addressing the underlying causes of their behavior. There are more than 210 specialized dockets in Ohio courts that deal with issues such as:

  • Drugs and alcohol
  • Mental health
  • Domestic violence
  • Human trafficking

The standards provide a minimum level of uniform practices for specialized dockets throughout Ohio, and allow local courts to innovate and tailor to meet their community’s needs and resources.

In this particular instance, the Family Dependency Treatment Court is provided as a voluntary option for parents whose children have been removed from their custody because of issues involving substance abuse.  The Family Dependency Treatment Court requires frequent court hearing attendance, office appointments, random drug screens, participation in substance abuse treatment and many other elements to support and encourage sobriety.

“The Family Dependency Treatment Court takes a holistic approach to deal with all problems in a family to bring families together again permanently. We have been successful in reunifying children to parents in very difficult circumstances. I am honored that the Supreme Court of Ohio recognizes the importance and great value in the program,” said Judge James A. Shriver.

The certification requirements include establishing eligibility requirements, evaluating effectiveness of the specialized docket, and assembling a treatment team for implementing daily operations of the specialized docket. The team can include licensed treatment providers, law enforcement, court personnel, and is headed by the specialized docket judge.

The Commission on Specialized Dockets has 22 members who advise the Supreme Court and its staff regarding the promotion of statewide rules and uniform standards concerning specialized dockets in Ohio courts; the development and delivery of specialized docket services to Ohio courts; and the creation of training programs for judges and court personnel. The commission makes all decisions regarding final certification.

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