February 6, 2019

Clermont County courts, other offices to close Friday for detective’s services

Detective Bill Brewer

BATAVIA, Ohio (Feb. 6, 2019) – All Clermont County courts and many county offices will be closed Friday, Feb. 8, to allow employees to attend, view or participate in services for Sheriff’s Detective Bill Brewer, who lost his life in the line of duty on Feb. 2.

CLOSED

Sheriff’s Office: Administrative offices close at noon Thursday and all day Friday.

Common Pleas Court: Closes at 2 p.m. Thursday and all day Friday. This also includes Probation, Law Library, and Court Services.

Juvenile Court/Probate Court: Closes at 2 p.m. Thursday and all day Friday.

Prosecutor’s Office: Closes at 2 p.m. Thursday and all day Friday.

Domestic Relations Court: Closes at 2 p.m. Thursday and all day Friday. All hearings will be scheduled to the next available time.

Board of County Commissioners’ office, and departments including Water Resources Administration Building, Building Inspection, Permit Central, Job & Family Services, OhioMeansJobs/Clermont County, and Department of Community & Economic Development: Closed Friday.

Municipal Court: Closed Friday. Those who have an arraignment scheduled for Friday will be sent a new court date. They can also check the Clermontclerk.org website for updated information.

Common Pleas Clerk’s Office, Domestic Relations Clerk and all auto title offices: Closed Friday.

Public Defender’s Office: Closed Friday.

Auditor’s Office: Closed Friday.

Recorder’s Office: Closed Friday.

Engineer’s Office: Closed Friday.

Public Health: Closed Friday.

Coroner’s Office: Closed Friday; on call at 513.543.0129.

OPEN

Some county offices will be open, including the Treasurer’s Office, which is accepting payments for first-half property taxes, which are due Feb. 13. The Municipal Clerk of Court Office will be open Friday. The Board of Elections office will be open Friday.

Bus service in Clermont County, including Dial-A-Ride, will operate normally.

The county website, www.clermontcountyohio.gov, has separate pages for each county office, including how to contact them. Check there if you have questions on whether an office is open or closed.

Services for Detective Brewer are as follows:

Family and friends are invited to a public visitation from 4-8 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 7, at Mount Carmel Christian Church, 4110 Bach Buxton Rd, Batavia, OH 45103, under the direction of E.C. Nurre Funeral Home in Amelia. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. Friday at the church. Interment will follow at Pierce Township Cemetery.

August 14, 2018

Cases of hepatitis A increasing in Clermont County  

Public Health Commissioner Julianne Nesbit

BATAVIA, Ohio – Clermont County is experiencing an increase in cases of hepatitis A. The Ohio Department of Health declared a statewide outbreak of the illness in June. To date, there have been 225 cases reported in Ohio.

Hepatitis A is a virus that affects the liver. It can be spread from person to person, or by eating or drinking food that is contaminated with the virus. Food can become contaminated with the virus when a person doesn’t wash their hands after using the bathroom and then prepares or touches food. Spread of the illness in the current outbreak is primarily occurring from person to person in high-risk groups.

People at higher risk for getting sick from Hepatitis A during this outbreak include:

  • People who have direct contact with someone infected with the virus
  • Men who have sex with men
  • People who use street drugs, whether they are injected or not
  • People who are incarcerated
  • People experiencing homelessness
  • People who have traveled to areas outside of the U.S. currently experiencing outbreaks

Symptoms of hepatitis A include fatigue, low appetite, stomach pain, nausea, clay-colored stools, and jaundice (yellowish color to the skin and eyes).

“We are working with at-risk populations to help prevent even more people from getting sick,” said Health Commissioner Julianne Nesbit.“Whether you are considered to be at high risk or not, anyone can get hepatitis A. So we encourage everyone to get vaccinated and wash your hands.”

For more information on the statewide outbreak of hepatitis A, visit the Ohio Department of Health’s website here.

For more information on hepatitis A from the Centers for Disease Control, click here.

Clermont County Public Health (CCPH) is dedicated to the mission of striving to improve Clermont County by preventing disease, promoting health, and protecting the environment. For more information, visit http://www.ccphohio.org.

 

May 11, 2018

Overdose deaths decline for 2nd straight year in Clermont County

BATAVIA, Ohio (May 11, 2018) – Deaths due to drug overdoses declined for the second straight year in Clermont County, according to the Clermont County Coroner’s Office.

In 2017, the Coroner’s Office, under the direction of Dr. Brian Treon, ruled that 76 deaths were caused by accidental drug overdoses. This compared to 83 in 2016, and 94 in 2015 – the highest number since Clermont County began to see the effects of increased opioid use in the late 2000s.

“We are encouraged by these numbers,” said Karen Scherra, the director of the Clermont County Mental Health & Recovery Board (MHRB). “These numbers indicate that the comprehensive measures we as a county have taken to address this issue are working.” The MHRB, the county hub in the fight against opioid addiction, is the lead organization in Clermont County’s Opiate Task Force, a collaborative that began in 2013 to address the opioid crisis in the county.

In 2017, more medication-assisted treatment and other kinds of treatment became available to more people suffering from substance abuse disorder, Scherra said. In 2017, MHRB spent over $1.9 million on addiction treatment services.

Other advances in 2017 included more Quick Response Teams, which go to the homes of those who have survived overdoses to connect them to recovery resources; and more police/fire/EMS departments carrying Narcan, which can reverse overdoses.

In addition, a long-term recovery home for men was opened in 2017 in Clermont County. MHRB is now working on funding to open a similar home for women. Clermont County also opened a women’s wing in the Community Alternative Sentencing Center. This jail alternative connects clients with multiple treatment options.

Funding for these initiatives are provided through a combination of MHRB levy funds, federal and state grants.

Clermont County Public Health, a member of the Opiate Task Force, is also on the forefront of the opioid battle. “In response to the rise in drug overdose deaths, we created an Overdose Death Review Committee in 2014,” said Public Health Commissioner Julianne Nesbit. “We look at aggregate level data to see if there are any trends that we can address to help reduce future deaths in the community.

“Since we first saw the increase in drug overdose deaths, we have had a full-time Injury Prevention Coordinator who works to educate the community and work with our partners on the drug epidemic.”

In March, Hamilton County reported that overdose deaths for 2017 had increased 31 percent over the previous year to 529. Butler County reported a 20% increase to 232.

More information on Clermont County’s Opiate Task Force can be found on its website, www.getcleannowClermont.org.

For more information, contact MHRB Executive Director Karen Scherra, kscherra@ccmhrb.org, 513.732.5407.

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February 27, 2018

Mercy Health – Clermont Hospital Hosts Syringe Services Program

(CINCINNATI; February 27, 2018) – Mercy Health – Cincinnati, which provides advanced, quality, compassionate care in your neighborhood through its care network, announces that Clermont Hospital is partnering with Clermont County Public Health and Hamilton County Public Health to offer a free syringe services program starting March 1.

The Exchange Project van, which is operated by Hamilton County Public Health, will visit the Clermont Hospital campus every Thursday from 10 a.m.–1 p.m. The hospital is located at 3000 Hospital Drive, Batavia, Ohio 45103.

In addition to providing access to sterile syringes, the program also offers testing and referral to treatment for HIV and Hepatitis C, education on prevention of infection and an access point to substance use disorder counseling and treatment programs. The program also provides naloxone, also known as Narcan, an opiate overdose reversal medication.

“A syringe services program is one more tool that we can use in the fight against opioid addiction. By providing resources such as referral to treatment and testing for HIV and hepatitis C, we can address other issues that accompany drug addiction,” said Julianne Nesbit, Clermont County Health Commissioner. “We are very fortunate to have a good partnership in place with Hamilton County Public Health and Mercy Health – Clermont Hospital to offer this valuable service.”

The needle exchange program, also known as a blood-borne infectious disease prevention program, is part of a wider comprehensive public health/harm reduction program.

“By providing access to sterile syringes to people who inject drugs, we can help reduce the spread of communicable diseases, such as hepatitis and HIV. Reported cases of hepatitis C, an infectious disease that can quickly transmit through injection drug use, increased by 40 percent in the last five years in Clermont County. During the same time period, the number of people living with HIV in Clermont County increased by 27%,” said Stephen Feagins, MD, Vice President of Medical Affairs for Mercy Health’s East market. “Harm reduction efforts, such as syringe service programs, have been shown to have a positive impact in these areas.”

Approximately one in three people ages 18-30 who inject drugs has hepatitis C and hepatitis C kills more Americans than any other infectious disease. For those who live with the disease, the medication cost alone to treat one case of hepatitis C is $84,000. The lifetime cost of treating one person living with HIV is $400,000. By contrast, the estimated cost of the Clermont County’s needle exchange program is $42,000 annually, with Mercy Health Foundation and Clermont County Public Health funding the program.

Other benefits of a syringe services program include:

  • Making used syringes valuable. People can exchange them for new ones, rather than discarding them in public areas.
  • Connecting people with treatment. People who inject drugs are five times as likely to enter treatment for substance use disorder when they use a syringe services program.
  • Reducing accidental needle stick injuries among first responders by providing proper disposal.

For more information about Clermont County Public Health’s syringe services program, visit http://www.clermonthealthdistrict.org/syringeservices.aspx. For more information on The Exchange Project, visit https://www.facebook.com/hc.xchange/.

 

February 22, 2018

Board of Health closes hotel pool and spa

Public Health Commissioner Julianne Nesbit.

BATAVIA, Ohio (Feb. 22, 2018) — The Clermont County Board of Health has closed the pool and spa at the Ameristay Inn and Suites at 2188 Winemiller Road in Batavia. The decision was made at the Feb. 14 monthly Board of Health meeting. The decision to revoke the license and close the pool was based on a pattern of code violations, and the failure by the hotel staff to comply with the Ohio Public Swimming Pool, Spa and Special Use Pool rules and regulations.

“We have been working with the operator of the pool and hotel, Mr. Raaj Patel since October to bring the pool into compliance with ongoing unresolved and continued violations,” said Health Commissioner Julianne Nesbit. “Unfortunately, Mr. Patel’s continued failure to comply with Ohio law regarding public swimming pools has forced us to close the pool to prevent anyone from getting sick or injured.”

“The hotel does not currently have any staff members that are familiar with the basic operations of a public swimming pool and spa,” said Nesbit. “Until Mr. Patel, can show that the pool and spa can be properly maintained with correct water chemistry, the pool will remain closed.” The spa was already closed due to mechanical issues.

All public swimming pools and spas in Ohio are required to be licensed by their local health department, and provide a daily log showing that the water chemistry of the pool is maintained within proper levels by a knowledgeable staff person.

Clermont County Public Health inspects 162 public swimming pools located in the county, and all inspection reports can be found on their website at www.ccphohio.org.

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Clermont County Public Health (CCPH) is dedicated to the mission of striving to improve Clermont County by preventing disease, promoting health, and protecting the environment. For more information, visit http://www.ccphohio.org or call 513.732.7499.

November 28, 2017

Clermont County Public Health earns accreditation

BATAVIA, Ohio  (NOv. 27, 2017) – Clermont County Public Health has achieved national accreditation through the Public Health Accreditation Board (PHAB). The accreditation program works to improve the quality and performance of the nation’s public health departments.

The national accreditation program is supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. To become accredited, an agency must show that they meet or exceed a set of standards, by going through a self-assessment, and a peer review.

“This has been a long process that we began in 2011, but our staff has worked very hard to finally achieve our goal,” said Health Commissioner Julianne Nesbit. “The process was very rigorous, and required us to submit more than 470 documents to be reviewed.”

 During the process, Clermont County Public Health conducted a Community Health Assessment and created a Community Health Improvement Plan and a strategic plan to help identify the biggest health threats to the community and help guide the direction of the agency in the future.

The Ohio Department of Health has required all 117 local health departments in Ohio be accredited by 2020. With this announcement, Clermont County Public Health becomes only the 18th local health department in Ohio to earn the distinction.

“Throughout the process we were able to analyze our programs and services and improve in many areas, which will benefit the citizens of Clermont County,” said Nesbit. Accreditation is an on-going process, and once the distinction is earned, it lasts for five years, then the health department will need to re-apply and begin the process again.

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Clermont County Public Health (CCPH) is dedicated to the mission of striving to improve Clermont County by preventing disease, promoting health, and protecting the environment. For more information, visit http://www.ccphohio.org or call 513-732-7499.

 

November 14, 2017

Clermont County Public Health seeks input on Syringe Services Program

BATAVIA, Ohio (Nov. 14, 2017) – Clermont County Public Health is seeking residents’ input on a proposed Syringe Services Program. A public forum will be held 6:30-8 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 30, at the Clermont County Engineer’s Office at 2381 Clermont Center Drive in Batavia. Public comments will also be accepted through an online survey.

Syringe Services Programs (SSPs) are public health programs that are intended to reduce the spread of infectious diseases such as hepatitis and HIV. The SSPs provide access to sterile syringes to people who inject drugs. The program can also make referrals to substance use disorder counseling and treatment programs. They also provide education on the prevention of infection and offer testing and referral for treatment for hepatitis C and HIV.

The proposed program in Clermont County would be a collaborative effort between Clermont County Public Health, Mercy Health – Clermont Hospital, Hamilton County Public Health, and the Exchange Project. A mobile van would come to the hospital parking lot one half-day each week to provide the services.

In Clermont County, the rate of hepatitis C infections have risen by 40 percent, and HIV rates have risen by 27 percent over the last five years. Clermont County ranks fourth in Ohio in drug overdose deaths.

“The Syringe Services Program would be a needed resource in Clermont County,” said Health Commissioner Julianne Nesbit. “The goal of the program is to lower rates of hepatitis C and HIV, while also providing access to treatment to people with substance use disorder.”

According to the Centers for Disease Control, people who inject drugs are five times as likely to enter treatment for substance abuse disorder and are more likely to reduce or stop injecting when they use a Syringe Services Program.

For more information on the Syringe Services Program, or to complete the community survey, visit www.ccphohio.org.

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Clermont County Public Health (CCPH) is dedicated to the mission of striving to improve Clermont County by preventing disease, promoting health, and protecting the environment. For more information, visit www.ccphohio.org or call 513.732.7499.

October 13, 2017

Clermont County Public Health launches new overdose tracking website

Public Health Commissioner Julianne Nesbit.

BATAVIA (Oct. 13,  2017) – Clermont County Public Health is releasing a new online tool, known as the Overdose Data Tool to aid in reducing drug overdoses. The website, http://tiny.cc/livestories is available to the public thanks to a partnership with Hamilton County Public Health, and the Funder’s Response to the Heroin Epidemic (FRHE), which provided the financial support to the project.

The website, updated daily, provides information about the number of overdoses reported by Mercy Health Clermont Hospital and calls to 9-1-1 in Clermont County. It also includes information from hospitals in other counties, if the person who overdosed lives in Clermont County. Other information provided includes the home zip code of each overdose and the number of overdoses reported by age group and gender.

“This will be a great tool to aid with targeting interventions in response to overdose activity in the county,” said Health Commissioner Julianne Nesbit. “This new site will allow for better communication between members of our Opiate Task Force including public health, mental health and recovery, local hospitals, law enforcement and EMS agencies.”

The mission of the Clermont County Opiate Task Force is to minimize opiate misuse, distribution, addiction, overdose, and deaths. Clermont County had 96 fatal drug overdoses in 2016, which was a slight decrease from the 105 overdose deaths recorded in the county in 2015.

The Funder’s Response to the Heroin Epidemic, which provided the financial support for the project includes the following investors: Bethesda, Inc., The Cincinnati Bar Association, Fifth Third Foundation, Jacob G. Schmidlapp Trusts, Greater Cincinnati Foundation, The Hatton Foundation, Interact for Health, The R.C. Durr Foundation, United Way of Greater Cincinnati.

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Clermont County Public Health (CCPH) is dedicated to the mission of striving to improve Clermont County by preventing disease, promoting health, and protecting the environment. For more information, visit http://www.ccphohio.org or call 513-732-7499.

September 29, 2017

Prescription Drug Take Back Day is Oct. 28

BATAVIA, Ohio (Sept. 29, 2017) – National Prescription Drug Take Back Day is Saturday, Oct. 28. There are multiple places in Clermont County to turn in old, expired, or unused prescription drugs.

Permanent drug drop-off boxes can be found here:

Amelia Police Department, 44 W. Main St.; Bethel Police Department, 120 N. Main St., Suite 2; Clermont County Sheriff’s Office, 4470 SR 222, Batavia; Goshen Police Department, 6757 Goshen Road; Loveland Police Department, 126 S. Lebanon Road; Miami Township Police Department, 5900 McPicken Drive, and Milford Police Department, 745 Center St., Suite 302.

Felicity Police Department, 415 W. Walnut St., and Pierce Township Police Department, 950 Locust Corner Road, will staff collection sites on Oct. 28 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

The Food and Drug Administration offers these guidelines on how to best dispose of unused prescription drugs: https://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm101653.htm.

For more information on National Prescription Drug Take Back Day, visit https://goo.gl/GXZgEf.

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September 1, 2017

Drug overdose deaths decline in Clermont County

BATAVIA, Ohio (Sept. 1, 2017) – The Ohio Department of Health has released its report on 2016 drug overdose deaths. Although the number of overdose deaths across the state increased for the seventh straight year, Clermont County’s overdose death totals dropped for the first time since 2009.

In 2016, there were 96 deaths related to drug overdoses in the county, compared to a record high of 105 in 2015. The finding was just one of several released by the Ohio Department of Health in its 2

Public Health Commissioner Julianne Nesbit.

016 Ohio Drug Overdose Data: General Findings.

While Clermont County did see a decrease in overdose deaths from 2015 to 2016, its death rate (based on a six-year average from 2011-2016) remains near the highest in Ohio. Only Montgomery, Butler, and Brown counties have a higher rate.

Statewide, the number of drug overdose deaths increased by 32 percent, going from 3,050 in 2015 to 4,050 in 2016.

While the number of heroin-related overdose deaths in Ohio remained somewhat steady, the number of fentanyl-related overdose deaths more than doubled from 2015 to 2016. There were 1,155 overdose deaths in Ohio from fentanyl and related drugs in 2015, and that number increased to 2,357 deaths in 2016.

“We have a long way to go and would like to see these numbers continue to decline, but this is an encouraging start,” said Health Commissioner Julianne Nesbit. “The Opiate Task Force has been hard at work addressing the drug epidemic, and this is a small accomplishment for all of the work the members have done.”

“It is a sad reality, but without the use of naloxone, these numbers could be much higher,” said Nesbit. Clermont County Public Health, along with the Clermont County Mental Health and Recovery Board, have been instrumental in making naloxone (better known by its brand name Narcan) more available to citizens in the county as well as local law enforcement and EMS agencies.

For more information on the Clermont County Opiate Task Force, visit its website at https://www.getcleannowclermont.org.

For the full report from the Ohio Department of Health, click here.

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Clermont County Public Health (CCPH) is dedicated to the mission of striving to improve Clermont County by preventing disease, promoting health, and protecting the environment. For more information, visit http://www.ccphohio.org or call 513-732-7499.